Book report high school


Basic Book Report Format

Then she photocopied the drawings onto appropriately colored sheets of paper -- ham on pink, tomato on red, Swiss cheese on yellow, etc. The sheets served as the ingredients for her students' book report sandwiches. Students stapled together their sandwich layers, then slapped their concoctions up on a bulletin board headlined "We're Hungry for Good Books!

The project made fun out of what can be a pretty hum-drum activity. Even better, the bulletin board served as a menu for students who were ravenous for a good read. All they had to do was grab a sandwich to learn whether a particular book might satisfy their appetites! Laura Hayden was looking for something to liven up book report writing for her students at Derby Kansas Middle School. One day, while exploring postings to the MiddleWeb Listserv , Hayden found an idea that filled the bill! Hayden challenged her students to be creative with the "Book in a After choosing and reading a book, each student selected a book report container.

The container could be a plastic bag, a manila envelope, a can, or anything else that might be appropriate for a book. Students decorated their containers to convey some of the major details, elements, or themes found in the books. When the containers were complete, students went to work on the contents of their containers.

They were instructed to include the following:. The third and final part of the project was the student presentation. Each student presented a "Book in a" project to the class. In the presentation, the student explained the connection of the container to the story, conducted a show and tell about the five things, and then shared information about three of the book's literary elements -- setting, characters, conflicts, climax, or resolution.

If you've been working on other literary elements with your students -- foreshadowing, personification, or flashbacks, for example -- you might give extra credit to students for pointing out those elements in their books. Why not challenge your students' creativity? Adapt Hayden's idea to fit your students' needs and skills. Are you worried that some of the ideas that follow will be too much fun? Take a look!

If an idea doesn't include enough writing, creative sneaky! Descriptive writing. Use this activity to supplement a class lesson in descriptive prose writing. Have each student read aloud the best example of descriptive prose found in the book he or she is currently reading. The student should write a paragraph explaining why the excerpt is a particularly good example of descriptive prose.

The paragraph might include some of the adjectives the author used to set the scene. Thumbs Up, Thumbs Down. Each student writes a review of the book he or she just finished reading -- in the style of a movie review. The student concludes by awarding a thumbs up or thumbs down on the book. This activity could be even more fun if two students read the same book.

They could plan a lively interaction, a la and Ebert and Roeper, about the book, which could be videotaped for all to see! Character Trait Diagram. Each student creates a Venn diagram to illustrate similarities and differences in the traits of two of the main characters in a book just completed.

A student might elect to create a Venn diagram showing similarities and differences between the book's main character and the student! Surfing the Net. Where did the story take place? When did it take place? Each student surfs the Net to find five Internet sites that others might check out before they read the book so they will know more about the book's setting or time period. Write a Letter to the Author.

WHAT'S NEW

After reading a book, each student shares reactions to the book in a letter written to its author. If a student writes to an author who is still alive, you might actually mail the letter.

Sell It. Each student pretends to be a publicist for the book that's just been read. The student writes and then delivers a second speech that will persuade other students that they should read the book. Writing and speaking persuasively will be especially difficult if the student didn't like the book. If that's the case, the student can share that fact after completing the speech. Create a Card Catalog. After reading a book, a student completes an index card with information about the book. The front of the card includes details such as title, author, and date published along with a two- to three-sentence synopsis of the book.

On the back of the card, the student writes a paragraph critiquing the book. Students might even rate the book using a teacher-created five-star rating system. Example: A five-star book is "highly recommended; a book you can't put down. Interview a Character. Each student composes six to eight questions to ask a main character in a book just completed. The student also writes the character's response to each question. The questions and answers should provide information that shows the student read the book without giving away the most significant details.

Ten Facts. Each student creates a "Ten Facts About [book title]" sheet that lists ten facts he or she learned from reading the book. The facts, written in complete sentences, must include details the student didn't know before reading the book. Script It! Each student writes a movie script for a favorite scene in a book just read.

At the top of the script, the student can assign real-life TV or movie stars to play each role. The student might also work with classmates to perform the favorite scene. Each student will need 30 index cards to create a Concentration-style game related to a book just finished. The student chooses 14 things, characters, or events that played a part in the book and creates two cards that have identical pictures of each of those things.

A book review is a critical analysis of a published work that assesses the work's strengths and weaknesses. A prominent reviewer can have a major impact on a book's reception. Many authors strive to have their books reviewed by a professional because a published review even a negative one can be a great source of publicity. One need look no further than Oprah Winfrey's famed Book Club to see the effect that this type of publicity can have on a book's sales.

There are countless book review examples , but first, let's discuss how to write a book review.

The Book Report Blues

A book review is not a book report. Resist the temptation to summarize the character, plot , theme, and setting, which was probably the formula you used in your high school English classes. Your readers are not interested in having the book re-told to them, and are certainly not interested in having the ending spoiled. To become a legitimate book reviewer, you need to be able to tell your readers whether the book you are reviewing is interesting, thorough, original, and worth spending money on or at least borrowing from the library.

Before writing a book review, you must, of course, read the book. Reading the first page, last page, and dust jacket won't cut it—you must read the book in its entirety, making quick notes about your impressions as you read. We also recommend that you ask yourself questions as you read. If the book is non-fiction, ask yourself, "Does the author have a clear argument that he or she is trying to prove? Is it original? Does he or she prove the argument successfully?

Are the arguments sound? Is it well-researched and well-written? Does the author omit any information that would have been relevant? For a work of fiction, ask yourself, "Is this work original? Are the characters well-rounded and believable?

7+ Middle School Book Report Templates & Samples - DOC, PDF | Free & Premium Templates

Does the plot twist, turn, and thicken, or does it plod along? Does the book address universal themes? Is the dialogue realistic? Make notes about the author's writing style: Is it irreverent or dry? Fast-paced or excruciatingly detailed?

Get Timely & Confidential Book Report Help at 24Writers.com

These are all things that potential readers will want to know. As a reviewer, you must tell them. When you begin writing the review, think about what your thesis is. Will your review be favorable, or do you plan to advise your readers to spend their money elsewhere? Just like in a college paper, remember to make your thesis known in the first few lines of your review. Need book report ideas for The Hobbit - posted in High School and.

book report high school Book report high school
book report high school Book report high school
book report high school Book report high school
book report high school Book report high school
book report high school Book report high school
book report high school Book report high school
book report high school Book report high school
book report high school Book report high school

Related book report high school



Copyright 2019 - All Right Reserved